Special Education Roles Beyond the Classroom

Special Education Roles Beyond the Classroom

Teaching is a profession that is both rewarding and challenging – particularly true for special education teachers. Working with students who need additional support can be satisfying yet emotionally draining, which likely contributes to the high turnover rate. Some sources estimate a 75 percent turnover rate for special ed teachers every 10 years, with 50 percent leaving their jobs within five years. Fortunately there are a variety of ways for people with special education experience and training to make a difference outside the classroom. 

Here are some special education jobs that don’t involve teaching:

Learning Disabilities Teacher Consultant (LDT-C)

Key elements:

  • Assess/diagnose students with learning difficulties, assist in the development of IEPs (individualized educational programs) and plan or implement instructional programs.
  • Support special education students by identifying their specific needs and ensuring they are met.

Prerequisites:

Requires completion of a graduate-level program, usually 24 to 33 credits – in addition to a master’s degree and often several years of teaching experience. (Note: This role is not found in every school district; research opportunities in your specific area.)

Special Education Advocate

Key elements: 

  • Advocates represent students (and their families) and speak on their behalf in the educational setting.
  • Plan, implement and monitor an educational plan for the student — serving as the student’s voice if any problems or concerns arise.

Prerequisites:

No specific training or certification is required by law but it is a good idea to pursue additional training with a specific focus on advocacy and special education regulations. The Council of Parent Attorneys and Advocates has a variety of helpful resources and training opportunities.

Educational Consultant

Key elements:

  • Share your expertise or experiences related to a specific educational topic or challenge.
  • Package your services in the format you prefer. Options include seminars, workshops or as-needed support.
  • As a self-employed consultant, you decide when and where you want to work.

Prerequisites: 

No additional credentials are required beyond a special education teaching background. 

Tutoring

Key elements:

  • Work as a self-employed freelancer scouting your own clients or sign up as a contractor providing services through a company such as Sylvan or Tutor.com.
  • Flexible schedule: You decide when and where you want to work.

Prerequisites:

Teaching experience and credentials are usually all you need — but some companies/clients will pay higher rates for tutors with special training or advanced education.

School Administration

Key elements:

  • A good option for those who are comfortable staying in the traditional school setting but don’t want to teach students directly.
  • Job titles range from special education administration to more general education roles such as vice principal.

Prerequisites: 

A master’s degree – including degree programs offered online – is a good start. You may then need to bolster your degree with specific administration-related training or certifications, depending on the position.

Fundraising Specialist

Key elements:

  • Lead fundraising efforts at organizations that assist children or education-related causes.
  • Good fit for those with persuasion skills or those motivated to use their winning personalities toward a positive goal.

Prerequisites:

Skills and experience are usually more important than educational degrees but training specifically related to fundraising is a valuable asset. Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis offers certification programs in areas such as Fund Raising Management as well as customized training options.

Publishing 

Key elements:

  • A big departure from an educational environment, this is an attractive option for those with specific expertise who are eager for a major change.
  • Various career paths including writing training guides for teachers, developing curriculum materials and training educators (high potential for business travel).

Prerequisites:

Varies based on role and hiring company. Employment notices will offer details.

Teachers who feel the need for a change can pursue a number of career paths that still allow them to provide valuable contributions to children’s education beyond the classroom. For those who want to support children with special needs in a non-teaching role, these special education job alternatives may provide the perfect solution. Learn more about alternative special education careers.

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