3 Valuable Pieces of Special Education Career Advice

3 Valuable Pieces of Special Education Career Advice

At any stage in your career, everyone can benefit from a solid piece of career advice. In the field of special education careers, these three individuals have excelled in their respective paths. Psychiatrist and ADHD specialist Dr. Ned Hallowell, classroom teacher and behavioral therapist Tim Villegas and speech pathologist Carrie Clarke all offer their wisdom regularly. Even if you’re not looking to build your career in their specific specialty, special education professionals should take their valuable advice to heart.

1. Dr. Ned Hallowell

Dr. Ned Hallowell, a New York Times bestselling author of more than 20 books, advises special ed professionals to “look for a mentor — a person in your field but not necessarily at your workplace — who can guide your career and point out trouble spots before they become barriers to advancement.” In all careers and lifestyles, he says: “What is most important is to work with what we have and recognize and accept ourselves for who we are. No amount of money or prestige can make us happy without self-acceptance. Love who you are and it will be easier to love what you do.”

2. Tim Villegas

Special education teacher Tim Villegas draws on his nearly 15 years in the field to advise those seeking jobs in special education on his blog. “Find a support system,” he says. “It is so important to be in contact with people who feel the same way about education as you do. For me, it was finding like-minded bloggers who were talking about the same issues in the same way. Second, you need to stop being afraid of change.” He encourages special ed professionals to ask: “Have you stopped growing as an educator? Have you stopped learning new things? Have you lost interest in refining your craft? Even if it means taking a class or joining a professional learning network, you may have to do something to change your situation.”

3. Carrie Clark

Carrie Clark, speech-language pathologist and blogger, encourages those pursuing special education careers to find ways to magnify their impact while avoiding burnout. She encourages educators to consciously collect their own success stories. “Before you leave your office each day, pull out a sticky note or a scrap of paper and write down one win that one of your students had. You don’t have to write their name. Just write down something awesome that happened for one of your kids in speech. The simple act of writing down these wins will help to keep you in a grateful and positive mindset. Plus, when you’re having a rough day, you can always look back through your jar to show you how much of a difference you really are making in these children’s lives.”

These strategies and mindsets helped these three experts excel in their work. While pursuing jobs in special education, use their tips to carve out your own path to success and more effectively help the children you work with – now and in the future.

Meet more special education professionals in our blog.

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *